Wednesday, September 04, 2013

This Eye Mandala Begs For Color


Here's a totally cool mandala I found at Shattered Butterfly
Something like this would be a lot of fun to color.
Check out her Etsy store to see how it looks in full color.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

EyeScapes - An Amazing Collection


Rankin, photographer and founder of Dazed and Confused magazine, created an incredible photographic series of more than a dozen decontextualized irises. Scrolling through these images is quite trance-inducing. The project is called EyeScapes.














Monday, September 02, 2013

Stress and Sight


Like breathing, seeing is not something you need to do, rather it is something which you allow. Most people, nowever, do not appreciate that seeing is essentially a passive process. They strain to count the stars in the sky, to read the tiny print of newspapers, and to keep awake while studying organic chemistry long into the night. The conditions of civilized life place our minds and bodies under continual tension which blocks our ability to let seeing take place naturally.

The idea that poor eyesight is primarily a result of stress was pioneered by ophthamologist William Bates, MD. The solution to our vision problems, according to Bates, is not to stop reading, or looking at the stars, or studying for an exam, but rather to telax the mental strain which supports the imperfect functioninf of the eye in both near work and distant vision. Aldous Huxley was one of the many who succeeded in diong this. Relaxation is the key.

Here's an exercise for relaxing the eyes:

Resting:
To relax your eyes is to relax your whole body. Since so much of our sensory input is visual, temporarily closing off this channel will almost immediately cause the rest of the body to slow down. Brain wave patterns change to a lower frequency as soon as the eyes are closed. Resting your eyes are an important way of reestablishing balance throught the system and reducint unnecessary strain.

Palming:
This is a technique developed by Bates for relieving eye strain.

  • Sit or lie down and take a few moments to breathe deeply.
  • Now gently close your eyes.
  • Place the plams of your hands over your eyes, with your fingers crossing over your forehead.
  • Use memory and imagination to realize a perfect field of black. see it so black that you cannot recall anything blacker.
  • Do not try to produce any experience. Simply allow the blackness to happen.
  • Continue for 2 to 3 minutes, breathing easily.
  • Remove your hands from your eyes, and open them slowly.
  • Do this several times a day, or whenever you need to relax.

From The Wellness Workbook

Sunday, September 01, 2013

Seeing Things As They Are


If the doors of perception were cleansed, 
man would see things as they are, 
infinite.

~William Blake

Friday, August 30, 2013

Mathematics of the Eye of Horus


Different parts of the Eye of Horus were thought to be used by the ancient Egyptians to represent one divided by the first six powers of two:
  • The right side of the eye = 1/2
  • The pupil = 1/4
  • The eyebrow = 1/8
  • The left side of the eye = 1/16
  • The curved tail = 1/32
  • The teardrop = 1/64
If that's a little confusing, here's what it would look like if drawn out in a square:

The Eye of Horus fractions represented in a square.
According to some schools of thought these divisions are also believed to have represented the various senses as shown in the image below:


Thursday, August 29, 2013

About the Eye of Horus


The Eye of Horus is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection, royal power and good health. The eye is personified in the goddess Wadjet (also written as Wedjat, or "Udjat", Uadjet, Wedjoyet, Edjo or Uto). It is also known as ''The Eye of Ra''.

The name Wadjet is derived from "wadj" meaning "green", hence "the green one", and was known to the Greeks and Romans as "uraeus" from the Egyptian "iaret" meaning "risen one" from the image of a cobra rising up in protection. Wadjet was one of the earliest of Egyptian deities who later became associated with other goddesses such as Bast, Sekhmet, Mut, and Hathor. She was the tutelary deity of Lower Egypt and the major Delta shrine the "per-nu" was under her protection. Hathor is also depicted with this eye.

Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The Wadjet or Eye of Horus is "the central element" of seven "gold, faience, carnelian and lapis lazuli" bracelets found on the mummy of Shoshenq II. The Wedjat "was intended to protect the pharaoh in the afterlife" and to ward off evil.

Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bow of their vessel to ensure safe sea travel.

From: Wikipedia

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Monday, August 26, 2013

The Eye As A Symbol


The symbolism of the eye occurs in so many places and in so many different forms that its pervasiveness symbolizes the "All Seeing Eye" itself. The eye is closely associated with the idea of light and of the spirit, and is often called the "mirror of the soul." When a person dies one of the first things that is done is that the eyes are closed, a timeless gesture that signifies the departure of the essence of life. Generally, the right eye is considered to be the eye of the sun, the left, that of the moon.

The eye represents the "god within," for example as the "third eye" whose position is designated by the small dot called the bindhu above and between the actual eyes. The Buddha is always depicted with this third eye. Here, the eye signifies the higher self, the part of man's consciousness that is ego-free and can guide and direct him. whereas the eyes are organs of outward vision, this "eye of wisdom" directs its view internally as the "eye of dharma" or the "eye of the heart."

As an occult symbol, the unlidded eye has its origins as the symbol of the Egyptian Goddess of Truth, Maat, whose name was synonymous with the verb "to see"; therefore the concepts of truth and vision were closely aligned.

The same eye symbol appears as the "eye or Horus," or Udjat. This stylized eye, with a brow above and featuring a curlicue underneath, represents the omnipresent vision of the Sun God Horus, and is a prominent symbol within the Western magical tradition where it represents, among other things, secret or occult wisdom. This eye was painted on the sides of Egyptian funerary caskets in the hope that it would enable the corpse to see its way through the journey to the Afterlife.

In Celtic magical lore, too, the eye equated with the Sun, and the planet and the eye shared the same name, Sul.

the All Seeing Eye, the eye within a triangle with rays emanating from the lower lid, is used not only in Freemasonry (where it stands for the "Great Architect of the Universe," for external vision, and also for inner vision and spiritual watchfulness) but in Christian symbolism too.

The eye symbol is used as a charm, painted on the sides of humble fishing boats, in order to protect the boat from the evil eye and to somehow confer this inanimate object with the power of sight of its own, a notion which follows exactly the same reasoning behind the practice of the Egyptians painting eyes on the coffins of their dead.

Belief in the evil eye is ancient, referred to in Babylonian texts dating back to 3.000 years before Christ. This is the idea that some people can curse an object (or a person) simply by the act of looking, as though the eye itself can direct a malevolent thought. It is a mark of the profound belief in the concept of the evil eye that there are so very many charms said to protect against it.

 From: Element Encyclopedia of Signs and Symbols
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